Episodes about "civil war"

Orestes Brownson: His American Thinking

Orestes Brownson: His American Thinking

Orestes Brownson, the first American Catholic intellectual, had strong ideas about Catholics’ place in American political life, as well as about slavery.

Catholics at Gettysburg

Catholics at Gettysburg

Catholics, including the Daughters of Charity and St. Francis Xavier church were heavily involved in the Civil War battle of Gettysburg.

Annie Chambers Ketchum

Annie Chambers Ketchum

Annie Chambers Ketchum started life as a stereotypical antebellum Southern lady, but as Tom and Noëlle Crowe tell us, by the end of her life she’d converted to Catholicism, was an accomplished poet and scientist, and had become a Dominican tertiary.
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Mother Beasley

Mother Beasley

Mother Beasley was a free Black woman who married into wealth and then gave it all away as a widow in order to found one of the first Catholic religious orders for Black women in the US. Tom and Noelle Crowe tell the story of this courageous woman who also defied the law to educate enslaved children and spent her life serving others.
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Daniel Rudd

Daniel Rudd

Born a slave before the Civil War, Daniel Rudd was a Catholic journalist, who was the first black man to own a national newspaper of any kind.

Father Peter Whelan: The Angel of Andersonville

Father Peter Whelan: The Angel of Andersonville

Fr. Peter Whelan was an elderly Irish priest in Georgia and South Carolina who brought Christ to the sick and imprisoned during the Civil War. Tom and Noëlle Crowe tell how brought Christ to both Confederate POWs in the North, and Union POWs at the most notorious prison camp in the South, Andersonville.
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James Longstreet

James Longstreet

James Longstreet was a Civil War Confederate general rejected by his former compatriots after the war, who eventually became Catholic.

Henriette DeLille

Henriette DeLille

Henriette DeLille was a woman of mixed race in antebellum New Orleans who rejected the placage system and founded an order that educated the children of slaves

Margaret Haughery

Margaret Haughery

Margaret Haughery, the “Bread Woman of New Orleans,” was an immigrant from Ireland who lost her family twice before starting successful businesses and doing extraordinary philanthropy.